STATE FUNERAL BLOG

  • 6 Oct 2017 11:25 AM | Anonymous

    Serving in the armed forces is not for everyone, but respecting and honoring those who sacrificed so much for our country is. I did not serve in the United States military but I am driven to honor those who both gave their lives for our country and many years of their life fighting overseas and protecting the home front. State Funeral for World War II Veterans is the perfect way that I can quench my thirst to honor all those who fought in the Second World War. A state funeral for the last living Medal of Honor recipient would both honor the sacrifice of all those in the armed forces, but also bring our country together during these increasingly divisive times. Everyone in the nation should support our troops that are currently serving and have served. Signing the State Funeral for World War II Veterans’ petition is just the first step I will take to ensure that the men and women that served in the Second World War receive the honor they deserve. I hope you will join me in supporting this effort.   


  • 21 Sep 2017 3:33 PM | Anonymous

    Americans of all races and ethnicities served with distinction throughout World War II. Native Americans served their country in a higher percentage than any other race during the Second World War. The most famous group of these Native American soldiers is the Navaho code talkers.  Their contributions were vital to the success of the Allies in winning the war.  Native Americans also served our nation in many other ways. Pima Indian Ira Hayes was one of the four brave men who raised the American flag over Iwo Jima. Joe Medicine Crow was the last member of the Crow Nation to earn the title of war chief and completed the four requirements (leading a successful war party, stealing an enemy’s horse, disarming an enemy, and counting coup) while fighting the Nazis. Edward McClish, of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, escaped captivity while wounded in the Philippines and went on to organize a small guerilla band. His men engaged Japanese forces over 350 times and inflicted more than 3,600 casualties on the enemy. For all their bravery, a total of five Native Americans received the Medal of Honor for their actions in serving of our country during World War II. In total, 27 Native Americans have received the nation’s highest military honor, the Medal of Honor. There is also a memorial on the grounds of the National Museum of the American Indian for all those who served during the Second World War.

    Even though the Native Americans served with such bravery and distinction, they were still discriminated at home. Native Americans were not allowed voting rights until well after the Second World War, in 1965. Despite this and other injustices, the Native American population has continually stepped up to serve our nation in all conflicts with complete selflessness.

    The 2010 Census identified 150,000 Native American military veterans. We at State Funeral for World War II Veterans would like to thank each and every one of them for their service to our country.  We would also like to recognize and thank our Founding National Board Member and Secretary, Mr. Adam Crepelle, a member of the United Houma Nation tribe.   


  • 18 Sep 2017 11:23 AM | Anonymous

    On September 16th, 2017, State Funeral for World War II Veterans had the privilege of interviewing Medal of Honor holder Woody Williams, Corporal U.S. Marine Corps.  Williams is the grandfather of our Kentucky Chairman, Brent Casey, and Ohio Chairman, Bryan Casey.  His heroic Medal of Honor action took place on Iwo Jima the day Marines raised the flag on Mount Suribachi.  Woody Williams commandeered a flamethrower to take out many Japanese pillboxes to clear a path for American tanks.

    Q: We are organizing in all 50 states to petition President Trump to designate a state funeral for the last of you four Medal of Honor heroes from World War II.  What do you think of our effort, Sir?

    A: I read the information and I totally agree with you…100%.  The idea of a state funeral for the last of us to go is great.  The nation needs this.  It brings recognition to all 16 million of us who wore the uniform.  A state funeral is part of our nation's history that can never be erased. 

    Q: What do you think about the fact that many Generals have had state funerals, but never a state funeral for an enlisted soldier?

    A: That is a great point.  This goes back to history.  This tradition of state funerals for Generals has never been broken, but is should be.  The Generals do the planning and give direction, but the grunts on the ground do the hard work.   

    Q: What were your initial thoughts when you learned about State Funeral for World War II Veterans and our mission?

    A: It is a new idea.  It is original.  The thing that impressed me was the recognition to all 16 million of us who served in uniform in World War II. 

    Q: What do you like best about our mission, Sir?

    A: The recognition at a state funeral should be for all, not just one man.   And, the historical record of the last Medal of Honor recipient from World War II having a state funeral will have great historical value.   

    Q: Is it OK if we put this short interview with you on your website?
    A:
     Please do. I support your efforts 100%. 

    Q: Lets have dinner in NOLA Nov 15 or Thursday Nov 16, when you speak at the World War II Event.

    A:  We will do it!

      

    To read Woody Williams’ full Medal of Honor Citation please go to: http://www.cmohs.org/recipient-detail/3066/williams-hershel-woodrow.php

     


"State Funeral for World War II Veterans" is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Donations are tax-deductible to the full extent of the law. Tax ID:  82-1730871.

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